Stumbled onto some old syrup tins today. Too bad they were all rusty, but it’s still fun to see the old labeling. It would have been cool to see the fresh paint on them! ... See MoreSee Less
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Beware! We have just been made aware that a third party google ad company is contacting other sugarmakers claiming to have worked with us and that their “contract” is up and they want to work with other sugarmakers. I guess we should be honored they made a whole video with our website and are trying to lie to gain customers, but don’t be scammed. We have never worked with any google ads companies like that and they are scamming sugarmakers. Be safe out there! ... See MoreSee Less
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Swing by Richmond, Vt fireworks tonight for maple cotton candy and old fashioned kettle corn! ... See MoreSee Less
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Our float was a mini sugarhouse set up. Our sap tank carried the flag from a local lost soldier John Putnam of Cambridge, VT. The trailer consisted of old wood and tin sap buckets, 2x6 evaporator, an old hand hewn sap trough given to us by some neighbors, an old yoke for over your shoulders for gathering sap, an old syrup sock filtering tank, and of course lots of moose antlers! To top it off we had maple cotton candy to hand out, and here and there Natalie took the leaf blower and would blow cotton candy into the crowd! Happy fourth everyone! ... See MoreSee Less
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Come see us in the Jeffersonville parade! ... See MoreSee Less
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An old blue spout forgotten and grown over in one of the big maple tree. The tree blew down in a wind storm and is now firewood for this winter. ... See MoreSee Less
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Just a photo from last fall to share. ... See MoreSee Less
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Snoozin supervisor. ... See MoreSee Less
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Our little farm hands. ... See MoreSee Less
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Come see us at the Vermont Renaissance Faire this weekend in Stowe! We will be slinging maple cotton candy, old fashioned kettle corn, and all the other delicious maple treats! ... See MoreSee Less
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My father’s farm hands. So much can be said in a photo without a face. Only of his hands, most favored in a rare embrace. These hands skipped rocks, rode bikes, played ball, pegged crab apples and threw snowballs to fill the time of childhood. Hands which used to tie shoes and cleats, then later transitioned into slipping on boots and squeezing teats. They were once trained to write to perfection, now they struggle through signing his grandson’s birthday card to show his affection. These hands once held his newborn children, but also had to lay two down to rest. They cut the logs, they built the house to raise his family in with his spouse. They also heated the home for his family year after year. piece by piece, cut up, split up, stacked up, thrown in. Handling wood he cut from the land 3, 4, 5x, just so the sharp knife of winter couldn’t touch the ones he loved inside. These hands delivered mail, bred cows, seeded corn, clover, alfalfa and timothy. Picked rocks, stacked stonewalls, picked pumpkins, stacked barrels. Fed calves, greased equipment, fixed water bowls, built stalls. They even delivered bull semen from farm to farm, with numb finger tips from the deep chill of liquid nitrogen. They worked naked enduring the cold of winter putting gutter cleaner chain together as the north wind blew. Then warmed themselves on the backs of his wriggling and giggling children. They gripped chainsaws, axes, crosscut saws. Embraced the handles of post malls as they lined fields and roads with cedar posts. These hands steered tractors round and round in the fields, only to do it again two to three more times that year, then again and and again for 60 years and counting, in a valley so pleasant, few will ever know. Hands rarely out of reach of a dog, or two, or eight. These hands scooped up fawns from fields, then placed them in the safety of the forest, then continued on their way guiding the tractor as it groomed the countryside. Hands which also plucked up freshly born calves from pastures, then placed them in the safety of a cozy barn, their home. The same burly hands used to dress and drag bucks from the valleys fields and ridges. Legendary hands. These hands held fresh corn silage to his face as he soaked in the aroma of fall. Once they became too cold to steer the tractor with the chopper, they would be moved inside the farmhouse and warmed by the wood fire, as grandma’s Christmas pickles simmered in pots inches away waiting for the sound of the lids to pop. These hands tapped trees, gathered buckets, held reins, strung tubing, tied lines filled fires. Countless hours spent through the night in the safety of gloves scooping maple syrup from the pan with a stainless scoop, then tipping it upside down watching it sheet off in slow motion, as the steam silently billowed by. Hands which filled so many tin cans of syrup and then shipped it around the country. These hands magically, painlessly pulled out his children’s loose teeth, but also were the same ones used to wallop their behind to keep them in line. Hands which cradled his face during the toughest times. Hands which threw to the sky as they rejoiced finishing marathon after marathon. These hands delivered calves, and more calves, all hours of the day and through sleepless nights. But also they are the same hands which squeezed the trigger to lay cows down to rest when illness dug too deep. They once held the hands of a woman on a first date. Then slid a ring on her finger. Clenched her hands through birthing their children. Held her hand as they watched their kids grow. These hands also felt the warmth of that lifelong partner grow cold, then laid her down to rest. Hands that don’t know what it means to quit, never give up, sometimes in motion 24 hours a day even though they still ached from yesterdays work. Hands which never stopped supporting his family. These same hands have been lucky enough to grasp those tiny ones of his grandchildren. Hands which now shake. No, not from disease, but with the reverberation of all they have accomplished and created. I don’t know what I’d do without those hands, and they don’t know how important they are to me. Their presence is all that’s needed.Once described to be rough, tough and coarse as leather, now they are gentle and soft as silk. They may not be calloused anymore, but those callouses are still present, just on all his son’s hands now. I will always appreciate my Fathers Farm Hands. ... See MoreSee Less
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We are enjoying some beautiful weather in Monroe, Ct for the strawberry festival with strawberries! Stop by to stock up on Vermont Maple Syrup and kettle corn! ... See MoreSee Less
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Some photos from the past month on the farm. ... See MoreSee Less
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A photo Dad had in a drawer today of the farm in august of 1990. “Back in the “good ole days”. We are creating more “good ole days” everyday. Boy the valley has changed a lot, but I am still awe struck daily. I will try to take a comparison photo tomorrow. ... See MoreSee Less
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An old maple that blew down in the sugarwoods. 60 years of growth just between my two fingers, well over 100 years old tree. ... See MoreSee Less
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Welcome to the Green Mountain State! ... See MoreSee Less
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Job security in VT. Friends and neighbors sent us pics and videos of moose going back and forth through the fences. 🤦🏼 ... See MoreSee Less
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“Other duties as assigned”.. 🙂 Thanks boys! ... See MoreSee Less
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What a whirlwind these last few weeks have been. We still aren’t sure how we ended up on Good Morning America! 😆www.goodmorningamerica.com/travel/video/gma-visits-vermont-welcomes-tourists-back-years-pandemic-...The Green Mountain State offers breathtaking views, irresistible bites, unique businesses and more. ... See MoreSee Less
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Getting there, 100 barrels to go. 🤞 ... See MoreSee Less
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Thank you to everyone who helped make our open house a success this year! We loved seeing familiar and new faces enjoying the sugarhouse, and couldn’t do it without our friends and family. Here’s to even more shenanigans next year! ... See MoreSee Less
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Nothing to see here.. this is what it’s supposed to look like! ... See MoreSee Less
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Open house weekend! 10-3 today and tomorrow! ... See MoreSee Less
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Trying sap for the first time! ... See MoreSee Less
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A big thank you goes out to my awesome wife for doing the leg work for this new logo on the sugar house! Also, thanks to Steve Ertle and Sammel Group for working with us to produce what we were looking for. Lastly, thanks to Geoffrey Cole for being the hold this while I screw it up on the wall guy. It should look good under the logo light I put up 8 years ago… I’m not a procrastinator at all. 😂 ... See MoreSee Less
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Our first batch of hats came in! Now if we can get Pop-pop to put his on despite his fear of getting one of his 3 dirty. ... See MoreSee Less
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She tight. Shouldn’t need to walk lines again this season. 😂 ... See MoreSee Less
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